Apple MacBook Pro 15-Inch Retina Display (2014)




 tested comes with an Intel Core i7-4770HQ processor with integrated Intel Iris Pro 5200 graphics. Add the performance from the 16GB of memory and speedy PCIe-based Flash Storage, and you'll likely never want for power. Multimedia scores were excellent: 1 minute, 17 seconds on the Handbrake video test (which matches the Dell Precision M2800 workstation in the lead of this group), and 3:25 on the Adobe Photoshop CS6 test, five seconds faster than the second place Toshiba Satellite P50T-BST2N01.
Intel's Iris Pro graphics is on board, and it's essentially the high performance version of Intel HD Graphics. Performance has improved to the point that Apple chose to use Iris Pro graphics on its base model instead of the mid-level discrete graphics found in older iterations of the 15-inch MacBook Pro. The laptop pulled some of the fastest frame rates on our 3D gaming tests (Heaven 22 fps; Valley 23 fps) at the medium quality settings. This is at least 10 fps higher than other Windows laptops with integrated Intel graphics. Only the systems with discrete workstation graphics like the Precision M2800 and Satellite P50T-BST2N01 had faster 3D performance. If you need a boost, the $2,499 version of the MacBook Pro 15-inch comes with Nvidia GeForce GT 750 graphics and a speedier Core i7 processor.
The latest model gained 33 minutes on our battery rundown test over its previous iteration (8:55 vs. 8:22). But competitive systems like the Dell XPS 13 Touch (9:31) and the Samsung ATIV Book 9 2014 Edition (11:26) lasted even longer. In addition, the Acer Aspire S7-392-5410 and Toshiba Kirabook 13 i7s Touch both pass the 8-hour mark on the same test. This shows that the Windows competition is starting to muscle in on Apple's former dominance in battery life.
Essentially, the new 15-inch Apple MacBook Pro is a very incremental upgrade to the model released late last year, and if you already have the 2013 model, there's no need to make the move. The Apple MacBook Pro 13-Inch, Retina Display (2014) is still our recommendation if you're willing to trade screen size for portability. That said, if you're a Mac power user upgrading from a pre-Retina-Display MacBook Pro (or MacBook Air), this laptop is certainly worth it. It's worthy of our highest recommendation and Editors' Choice badge for best high-end desktop-replacement laptop.